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What day was Jesus really crucified, resurrected?

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Posted: Saturday, May 7, 2011 12:00 am

An L.A. Times article appeared on April 23 in the News-Sentinel regarding a book written by British researcher Colin Humphrey. The author claimed that Jesus and his disciples ate the "Lord's Supper" on Wednesday, not Thursday, as most Christians have been taught.

He is in agreement, though, with most Christians when he writes that Jesus was crucified, died and was placed into a tomb on Friday and arose on Sunday morning.

The Friday-to-Sunday believers state that Jesus died on the day of preparation, which is, they say, the day before the weekly Sabbath. John 19:14 indicates that the day of preparation noted here was preparation for the Passover. This is clarified in verse 31.

The Greek word here for the day after the preparation day literally means "great day" and is never used for the weekly Sabbath. Thanks to the development of super-computers, many questions have been answered.

Jesus and his disciples had a Passover Seder in the home of a member of the Essene sect on Tuesday, which was Passover on the Essene solar calendar. He was executed on Wednesday, Nisan 14, which was the preparation day according to the Hebrew lunar calendar, and placed into a tomb before sundown.

He arose three days and three nights later on Saturday, just before sundown, as he had prophesied in Matthew 12:39-40. This took place in the year 3790 of the Hebrew calendar, which would be 30 A.D. on the Gregorian calendar.

The Greek reading in Matthew 28:1 states clearly that the Resurrection would be "in the end of the Sabbath as the first of the week was approaching." Most English translations of this verse are in error.

The Apostolic Writings, popularly known as the New Testament, was written by Jews primarily for Jews. Europeans like Mr. Humphrey cannot expect to fully comprehend the history, beliefs and practices of first-century Jews in Israel without the assistance of Jewish scholars.

Cliff Shirk

Lodi

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