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Let's work together to bring a Trader Joe's to Lodi

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Posted: Saturday, December 4, 2010 12:00 am | Updated: 6:57 am, Sat Dec 4, 2010.

This letter is in regards to Lodi needing a Trader Joe's.

My husband and I are the owners and operators of the Lodi Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites. Through the normal course of running our new business, I interface with many other local residents of this special Lodi community. Hardly a day goes by — whether at school picking up our kids, grocery shopping or making purchases for our business — that someone doesn't bring up the need and desire for a Trader Joe's market in Lodi.

I talked with the developer of Reynolds Ranch, Dale Gillespie, who told me that they had been in repeated contact with the real estate department of Trader Joe's and that they have no current plans for a store in Lodi.

I decided to do what little I could and write them a message requesting that they seriously consider a store in Lodi. I found that there is an actual page on Trader Joe's website specifically to request a new Trader Joe's location. I would like to request that any of readers of this letter that share this interest in a new Trader Joe's for Lodi go to www.traderjoes.com/about/location-requests-form.asp and fill in the form requesting a store for Lodi. Maybe if they here from enough Lodians, they will more seriously consider us.

I think we can all agree that anything we can do to keep our dollars in our community pays dividends in terms of local jobs, local sales and property tax generation and an occasional stay by corporate personnel at ours or another local hotel.

Beth Kim

Lodi

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Welcome to the discussion.

46 comments:

  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 11:44 pm on Sun, Dec 12, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kim, I do not know how points get turned up side down in these blogs.... I do not have theories, I just have experience. Your experience is different that my experience. To me, it does not mean I am right, or you are wrong, it means we have had different experiences. When I have gone to food for less, normally, there is a heavy population of Hispanics there. I enjoy shopping with Hispanic people so I happen to notice when there are more Hispanic people in the area. When I have shopped at Trader Joes, rarely have I come across Hispanic people at all. So in my experience, I have noticed a very different crowd at each facility. If you look at the foods that are sold at each store, the foods are dramatically different as well, which by intension caters to a certain kind of crowd. Both stores want to make money and serve their customers.

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 7:57 pm on Sun, Dec 12, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Darrell Baumbach asked, "Kim, can I conclude that because you shop at both stores, similar crowds frequent both establishments? if not,what point were you making?"

    Darrell: I was addressing your comment when you said... "there is a significant difference in Trader Joe's customers and food for less... a completely different crowd and population."

    Darrell, I simply disagree with you. I shop at both Trader Joe's and Food 4 Less and spend about an equal amount at these two stores. You were trying to make a TJ's crowd and a Food 4 Less crowd seem so incredibly different from one another when in fact they are not so different... hence the reason I stated that I shop at both stores. I don't change who I am when I shop at either store. I am the example that blasts your theory.

    Personally, I don't decide that I will not shop at a store due to the upscale dress of the patrons, or people with dreads and sandals. It's funny how some people say TJ's is full of stinky people with dreads and sandals and other people say the store is full of snobby rich people. Which is it, folks? Could it be that the store simply attracts...uh...I don't know... "people"!?

    Sheesh.

    You see, there are people from many walks of life that care about their health. I believe that these are the people that enjoy Trader Joe's.

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 7:57 pm on Sun, Dec 12, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Charles Nelson: I don't do much grocery shopping in Elk Grove, as it's too far away. I have never been to the TJ's in Elk Grove, but the one in Stockton is far from what you describe. It sounds like a Nugget store would be nice here too.

     
  • Charles Nelson posted at 12:04 am on Thu, Dec 9, 2010.

    Charles Nelson Posts: 259

    Ms. Lee, I shop at the TJ's in Elk Grove. You walk in, and they have a limited selection of mediocre fresh produce and cheeses straight ahead. Frozen foods of limited quality in the middle. Surrounded by some crackers, tortillas, and proprietary brands of mostly uninteresting jarred and packaged goods. And, a whole bunch of wines that are either available about every else you go, or of poor quality. So what you do. is get back in your car, drive across the street to the Nugget Market, and walk into what a real sophisticated foodie paradise looks like, with a wine selection to rival the best wine shops. It's also one of the best places to work in the whole country. TJ's had zero on the Nugget!

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 11:28 pm on Wed, Dec 8, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kim, can I conclude that because you shop at both stores, simular crowds frequent both establishments? if not,what point were you making?

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 8:03 pm on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Darrell Baumbach said, "there is a significant difference in Trader Joe's customers and food for less... a completely different crowd and population."

    Darrell: I shop at both Trader Joe's and Food 4 Less. I would stop in a TJ's more often if they had a store in Lodi, but right now I spend about an equal amount at these two stores.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 2:52 pm on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kim stated...Besides, we're talking about the interest in a Trader Joe's in Lodi California. This is not Asia.

    of course... if you read the blogs below, there was significant attention paid to the possibility that Lodi had less intellectual types compared to other cities as a reason the trader Joes had not opened a store in Lodi... I was responding to that line of thinking... I did not bring that issue up... I was responding to it... to not address that issue is ignoring reality as there is a significant difference in trader joes customers and food for less... a completely different crowd and population.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 2:41 pm on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kim... Maybe I do not understand snobbish... I have always felt it meant that it pertained to someone who perceived their way of life and intellectual level was above anothers. I do not think of myself as above anyone. I simply prefer to assocaite with people to accept others that are less fortunate... If it is snobbish to not accept others who think they are better than others... then maybe I am snobbish...

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 12:47 pm on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    I don't feel superior because I shop at Trader Joe's. And I am a very casual dresser, and person. In fact we may be after the same thing. I want healthy real food. Food without pesticides and all that garbage...whole foods, fresh foods, simple foods... all at a reasonable price. Sure, I'll throw in some fancy mustard and spices in my cart too, but it sounds like you're into that too. To me, Trader Joe's makes shopping easy, as it's a concentrated source of all the things I deem good for my health.

    Besides, we're talking about the interest in a Trader Joe's in Lodi California. This is not Asia.


     
  • Kim Lee posted at 12:36 pm on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Darrell Baumbach said, "I also find many Americans to be snobbish or look down on others when they compare what they do with what others do…"

    Darrell: Isn't that exactly what you've been doing here?

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 1:03 am on Tue, Dec 7, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    hubble = humble below

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 6:52 pm on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Bobin stated...prevent him from his stated business of outsourcing American jobs to Asia ... Ms Bobin.... that is 10% of the reason I am here... I would be here no matter... There are less people like you here, I cant think of a better reason to be here.... people here are hubble and good hearted, appreciate Americans that show respect. Its a simple life that reflects freedom I wish America had. Freedom is what I am after ... freedom from government regulations and control and freedom from angry bitter cold hearted people like Ms Bobin.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 6:14 pm on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    and...just to be more clear... sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words...

    I made a video on foods prepared and sold on the streets in Thailand ... its posted on you tube... makes my mouth water ... no stores, no refrigeration, no government regulations.... just good food to eat at low prices...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_udPNSNt9I

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 6:03 pm on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Ms Bobin is correct... in one thing... I am not ignorant enough to eat food that could potentially cause me to suffer from dysentery, hepititis, or other infectious diseases. However, I sincerely do prefer the company of poor people while eating. I also prefer to eat what poor people eat as the flavors and natural items they use are healthy from my perspective. They eat bugs, red ants and other insects that are nutritious. I join them in eating what they eat.
    • And Brian… I certainly am not suggesting that the modern supermarkets in Asia are doing a disservice to those living in third world conditions. To make that comment though means that you are not familiar with typical Asian eating preferences. What is most typical is local people cooking just about on every street corner especially in China, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos… these people cook great food at low prices. They do not have to pay for overhead, and money collected is almost pure profit. Most people who build a house here have very small kitchens as buying food yourself and cooking it is more expensive than eating out. I might spend 3 dollars at the store for food to cook, that would only cost me 2.00 if someone prepared it for me.

    If people want to shop at Trader Joes… no problem. I simple think it is superficial and silly to contemplate intellectual capacity and level to what food to choose to buy. I also find many Americans to be snobbish or look down on others when they compare what they do with what others do… it’s my experience I draw my conclusions from. Just look at Brains comment “Do you also look forward to the bouquet of the open sewers in your travels in Asia”… of course I do not and neither to good poor people anywhere. That is a disgusting comment to make.

    When ms Bobin states… he is letting you all know that he 1) can afford to travel to Asia, and 2) is much more worldly than anyone else, she is incredibly mistaken.
    I am letting you know that there are many circumstances in the world that people live in on a daily basis that is considered to be unfortunate from USA standards. However, it is not unfortunate from my perspective and it is in USA that many people suffer a different plight… one of superiority and lack of humbleness. I am not better than anyone and feel fortunate experience humble people who have good hearts. What breaks my heart it to see asian students attend American universities then return home in Asia only to show animosity towards their native culture. As far as me being able to travel… I spend $15.00 to $20.00 per day for all expenses… I live very modestly and give to others here more than I spend on myself…. So to assign selfish motivations to my travels are ignorant.

     
  • Joanne Bobin posted at 1:54 pm on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Joanne Bobin Posts: 4488

    Mr. Dockter - perhaps you do not understand Mr. Baumbach's signature efforts at projecting his superiority. By putting down TJ's as only being patronized by "sophisticated types," and claiming that he would rather eat fly infested food "in Asia, ... at an unclean street corner with a local person cooking food on the side of the road," he is letting you all know that he 1) can afford to travel to Asia, and 2) is much more worldly than anyone else.

    I am sure that Mr. Baumbach is not ignorant (enough) to eat food that could potentially cause him to suffer from dysentery, hepititis, or other infectious diseases that would ruin his business trip and prevent him from his stated business of outsourcing American jobs to Asia which, as he indicates, is very free from the type of regulation he so loathes here in the US.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:36 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Darrell,

    Certainly you're not suggesting that the modern supermarkets in Asia are doing a disservice to those living in third world conditions.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:32 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Darrell,

    Do you also look forward to the bouquet of the open sewers in your travels in Asia?

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 6:46 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Darrell wrote:

    I would rather eat food with flies surrounding it than shop with the kind of people that obviously frequent that store.

    -Darrell,

    And you are much more likely to die from a food born disease in one of the marketplaces you ENJOY frequenting in Asia. To each his own.
    And why you don't give a hoot about the health standards the U.S. has is beyond me.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 4:18 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kim stated...Most people don't go to TJ's for a social hour or even care what the other shoppers look like or what their social status may be (who cares?)

    Kim, certainly you must know that is precisely the point I was making.... but I do disagree with you about the shoppers there... I have been there a number of times and noticed a certain intellectual crowd ... one which would never eat where I eat.

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 1:02 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Darrell Baumbach said, "I know now that I definitely lack any kind of intellectual stature and am a certain outcast."

    Don't be so hard on yourself, Darrell.

     
  • Kim Lee posted at 1:01 am on Mon, Dec 6, 2010.

    Kim Lee Posts: 1798

    Beth Kim: I would like to have a Trader Joe's in Lodi too.

    I enjoy the products offered at TJ’s and, of course, it would be much more convenience to have the store in town here. I like how TJ's has so many of the kinds of food items I like all in one store. They offer a store full of items for the health conscience individual. Their produce, meat, dairy and other healthier food choices are reasonably priced as well (I've compared them). If you are health conscience and/or want to find certain foods not found in regular grocery stores then Trader Joe's is the place to go.

    Darrell Baumbach: Most people don't go to TJ's for a social hour or even care what the other shoppers look like or what their social status may be (who cares?). TJ fans are there for a more important reason...their health. I think your problem, as you describe it, with TJ's has more to do with your personal issues than it does with anyone that shops at the store.

    Charles Nelson: You said that TJ's "seems to hire the dregs of society". I don't know what TJ's you shop at, but the one in Stockton has never hired anyone that I would describe as "dregs of society" (if I were to use those words at all). That's a really odd comment. The employees in Stockton are always helpful, pleasant, hard working and very courteous.

    I know Trader Joe's would make more money from me if they were to come to Lodi. I am positive that the Lodians I know would spend more too.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 9:39 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    I know now that I definitely lack any kind of intellectual stature and am a certain outcast.
    I really dislike shopping at trader Joes… I always felt uncomfortable and somehow not acceptable while in that store. Now, after reading these Blogs about TJ’s, I finally understand why. Evidently, sophisticated types go there and have abilities to detect and ascertain which items in the store are worthy to be purchased. They also have the ability to analyze which products are socially acceptable and if friends were invited to their home, would appreciate the thoughtful selections that were purchased at this store.
    Personally, now that I am in Asia, I enjoy stopping at an unclean street corner with a local person cooking food on the side of the road. No refrigeration and no codes to make sure government regulations are followed. Many poor people are there and it feels so good to eat with them and not worry about intellectual standards that one experiences at Trader Joes. I would rather eat food with flies surrounding it than shop with the kind of people that obviously frequent that store.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:04 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Charles wrote:

    I've never seen a mangier looking group of employees in any retail store. They all look like people who couldn't meet the standards at Wal Mart.

    -Yes they may be somewhat mangie. However, they aren't low lifes. TJs has it's roots with the original grocery Co-Ops of the 60's and 70's. Many of these Co-Ops are still around. Nevada City has The Breyer Patch.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 6:29 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    I bet when Tower Records in Stockton closed down there was an initial
    loss of business to Trader Joes. I can think of the many times I went to Tower that I also went to TJs. It was like peanut butter and jelly. I still like the intellectual stimulation
    when I shop at TJs. It just doesn't happen at Sprouts or Whole Foods here in Phoenix.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 6:22 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Charles,

    TJ's isn't much different than Wal-Mart in a sense that the pay is about the same for it's employees and management. Working there is very low key and doesn't require a whole lot of thought process. I think this type of atmosphere is what the powers to be at TJs are after. People that shop at TJs do tend to scrutinize what they consume. However,
    this idea that only the well educated and higher income bracket are the main customers
    IS somewhat true. My observation is that many who shop TJs tend to gravitate to places where there is a certain amount of intellectual sophistication in the air. Like Barnes and Noble, Starbucks, and the now defunct Tower Records. You could do a survey and I bet these people who frequent places like this are also TJs junkies.
    With the loss of Tower Records, this gaping hole has not been filled by Starbucks in Lodi. Of course they do go to TJs in Stockton. But, mark my word. A TJs in Lodi
    would be like a Tower Records it never had. Heaven on Earth would be the proper
    description of how it would go over so well in Lodi.

     
  • Charles Nelson posted at 4:49 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Charles Nelson Posts: 259

    Brian, Folsom and Morgan Hill are highly populated with highly educated people with big white collar incomes. Plus they have high populations of same in their immediate vicinity. The foothills and Delta are loaded with Velveeta eating rednecks. What I don't understand is why TJ's requires a certain highbrow requirement for its locations, and seems to hire the dregs of society. I've never seen a mangier looking group of employees in any retail store. They all look like people who couldn't meet the standards at Wal Mart.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 2:46 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    The tax dollars generated by TJs would be enormous. There ARE still many people in Lodi who don't like to go to Stockton unless they absolutely have to. This amounts out to a lot of money being spent in Lodi or not being spent because they refuse to go to Stockton. Mark my word many of the wealthy in Lodi have runners to TJs in Stockton.
    And many more don't or won't.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 2:39 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Morgan Hill has a population of only 37,000 and has a TJs. The median income is
    about $80K a year, though. But I don't buy this notion by TJs that Lodi's demographic does not qualify it for a store because TJs really does cater to the small family and single person anyway.
    Their profit margin is very slim on many things. But they make it up in volume sold.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 2:20 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Curious that Folsom CA has a population of 67,000 and it has a TJs.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 2:00 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Charles,

    You seem to be missing my point. I haven't added up all the combined populations of
    towns in the foothills and the delta in the immediate area and Lodi. But I would take an educated guess that combined they meet or exceed the population of Stockton.

     
  • Charles Nelson posted at 12:14 pm on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Charles Nelson Posts: 259

    Bakersfield and Stockton are the 11th and 13th largest California cities. Lodi isn't even in the top 100. The good news is that the #100 largest city has a Trader Joes. The bad news is that it's Napa. I'm sure Napa has a few numbers superior to ours,

     
  • Charles Nelson posted at 11:58 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Charles Nelson Posts: 259

    Stockton has nearly 5 times the population of Lodi, Bakersfield has over 5 times the population of Lodi. I'm sure that they meet certain demographic criteria simply by their sheer numbers. People seem to be ignoring the fact that Lodi is a still a small town.

     
  • Kevin Paglia posted at 8:48 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Kevin Paglia Posts: 2018

    Darrell, the article I posted was actually more humorous than defending any position. A friend of mine on FB posted it in reference to our hometown's (Bakersfield) low ranking. As was commented after he posted, Bakersfield leads the country in being the lowest in rankings.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 8:48 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    http://www.cvbizjournal.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=506:lodi-vineyards-flourish&Itemid=83

    There’s more: 39.7 million cases of Lodi Appellation wine were produced, there were two million wine related visits, tourist expenditures were $409.5 million, the Lodi wine industry paid $170 million in federal taxes, $155 million in state and local taxes, and contributed $35 million to charity, according to the Stonebridge Research study, “Economic Impact of Wine and Grapes in Lodi 2009.”

    -But none of those 2 million wine related visits would go to TJs according to how they
    determine a stores location. I wonder who's at the helm of their marketing dept?

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 8:40 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    http://www.cvbizjournal.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=506:lodi-vineyards-flourish&Itemid=83

    Lodi varieties lead the way

    Contributing to that $5 billion winegrape economy is Lodi’s leadership among all California districts in the production of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Zinfandel, grown the longest of all varieties.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 8:35 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    I would say the fact that there were 89 floats in the Parade of Lights
    exemplifies the very type of people who would cater to a TJs. :) And, Stockton
    TJs has a huge customer base that consumes a lot of wine. Lodi has more wineries per capita than any other city in CA. HMMM

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:41 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=353529

    Facts on TJ's demographics.

    Although TJ's may make some good points, I think they are missing out on a great opportunity to take residence in Lodi.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:24 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Jerome,

    How TJs defines "educated" needs to be explored. Because, I would say Lodi
    has far more people per capita than Stockton when it comes to making educated choices on what they eat. There seems to be disconnect with TJs. I would go as far as saying that the Stockton TJs may be worried that the many Lodians who shop there
    won't need to come back if a TJs is built in Lodi. Perhaps someone needs to find out just
    how much of the Stockton TJs customer base is from Lodi, the foothills above Lodi, the delta, AND Morada.

     
  • Brian Dockter posted at 7:01 am on Sun, Dec 5, 2010.

    Brian Dockter Posts: 2830

    Trader Joes is overlooking the many wealthy and educated people of
    Morada. Not to mention the many wealthy and educated people in the country
    east of 99 in Lodi. Perhaps TJs does not think operating a farm or owning
    a large house does not take an education. That being said, I may have to opt out in
    shopping Tjs here in Phoenix if this is the case.

     
  • Darrell Baumbach posted at 9:09 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Darrell Baumbach Posts: 9405

    Kevin, I think you are supporting Jerome’s point strongly if you select to use Huffington Post as a source to support any point.

     
  • Josh Morgan posted at 9:08 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Josh Morgan Posts: 532

    I'm just surprised that if intelligence was a consideration that TJ's would locate a store any where in California.

     
  • Kevin Paglia posted at 4:13 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Kevin Paglia Posts: 2018

    I don't know about TJ's excuse for not coming here I know there is one in Bakersfield which ranked in the bottom five for braininess http://news.yahoo.com/s/huffpost/20101203/cm_huffpost/791661_201012031319. So why is there on there and not here?

    P.S. Sacramento # 68
    Stockton # 190
    Backerfield # 195

    No mention of Lodi

     
  • Jerome Kinderman posted at 2:31 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Jerome R Kinderman Posts: 2350

    Mr. Taves suggests that "Trader Joe's would be profitable in Lodi." That might be true, but they consider far more than just profit margins when determining where to open a new store. I actually believe they place their reputation over profits. They responded as such when questions were raised as to why they denied Lodi the opportunity to open here. In short, as I recall there simply aren't enough "educated" people living in Lodi that would qualify us. Just how do we correct that demographic defect?

     
  • stan taves posted at 2:03 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Stan Taves Posts: 313

    Trader Joe's would be profitable in Lodi.

     
  • Charles Nelson posted at 12:15 pm on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Charles Nelson Posts: 259

    You can do all the cheerleading you want, but ultimately the decision is completely up to Trarer Joe's parent company. I'm sure they have others seeking the same.

     
  • Jerome Kinderman posted at 10:59 am on Sat, Dec 4, 2010.

    Jerome R Kinderman Posts: 2350

    Ms. Kim, awhile ago when the debate was heating up about Wal-Mart's expansion on this very forum, the subject of a Trader Joe's was discussed. At that time I learned that among other things the intellectual level and income potential of a community's population is seriously considered. Perhaps these factors have changed, but I doubt just asking them to consider Lodi (again) will alter their decision.

     

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