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‘States of America’ still exist today

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Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2012 12:00 am

I am proud of the July Fourth holiday, definitely a legitimate holiday. Indeed, the Declaration of Independence established the people's independence from England, and they styled themselves as the "States of America," an entity which still exists today — but it is not used. In spite of the blunders which followed, one event is undisputed: Lord Cornwallis surrendered his sword to General Washington in 1781, and England lost its claim to the land.

All that remained was that the colonists would establish a government. If lawyers were involved, what an irony! Is the title "esquire" not British?

The States of America possessed a right to establish a government on the land, but I don't think they did. In the Treaty of Paris of 1783, King George III used the title "arch-treasurer and prince elector of the Holy Roman Empire etc., and of the United States of America." A few years later, the Constitution is stated to be "for the United States of America," and it made no reference to "States of America," which had declared independence. (The reference to the Holy Roman Empire etc. is another story.)

I also think it is interesting that "United States" appeared in the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, which established districts, without making reference to natural geographical features of land. Subsequently, the preamble stated that "We the People of the United States" (created through districts, not upon land) do ordain and establish the Constitution for an entity for which King George III was arch treasurer and prince elector.

Daniel Hutchins

Acampo

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