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Calcium deposits in pipes are cause of metallic-tasting drinking water, city of Lodi says

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Welcome to the discussion.

3 comments:

  • Doug Chaney posted at 2:14 pm on Wed, May 15, 2013.

    advocate Posts: 501

    And water from the Mokelumne river just downstream from the Waste Management garbage dump transfer station, where some of the the worst readings from the water watchers come from. What planning commission and city council in their right mind would have allowed Vaccarezza to build there attracting vermin, birds and their droppings to be massive runoff adding to the pollution and contamination of the pesticides, herbicides, sulfur and other poisons from the agriculturists, mostly wine grape growers? It seems only the likes of livable, lovable Lodi and their pandering, greedy council and management teams. And then pull off the biggest boondoggle of all, the unnecessary and unneeded water treatment plant that was to be paid for by the local developers, but ended up costing the taxpayers of Lodi tens of millions of dollars. No one knows for sure because the final cost and numbers seem to be in a protected mode. For a project with an engineer's estimate of around 32 million and the low bidder at around 21 million and 45 million or so in bonding, it seems like that 45 million in bond funds is more than twice the winning contractors bid? Just how much of the 45 million bond was used for the unnecessary and unneeded water treatment plant and how much was used for other projects not included in this bond funding?

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 9:51 am on Wed, May 15, 2013.

    advocate Posts: 501

    I'd think in my years of installing underground and overhead water infrastructure systems that the problem could be the many contractors and subs that are using fire hydrants to fill their water trucks and portable water trailers without using any metering or backflow prevention device are not only a probable cause of this "calcium" buildup but also of contamination of the potable water system due to the lack of backflow preventer/meter apparatus while filling their dirty water trucks or trailers. And the flushing of ALL piping that has been installed to all properties that have received a new water meter device. Lodi is the only city/public works that doesn't apparently require their contractors and subs, or any contractors for that matter, to use a meter/backflow prevention device during the transfer of potable water from the public water system. Any city or town I've worked in in my plumbing/fire prevention career, 30 years including a five year apprenticeship program, I've had to go to public works to apply for and receive a flow meter system, which consists of a water meter/backflow preventer check valve, and pay the fee plus deposit for the appurtenance that attaches to a fire hydrant, along with a hydrant wrench, to assure the authority having jurisdiction that if used properly, the potable city water drinking system won't be contaminated. It also serves the dual purpose of metering the actual use of the amount of water used and calculates any additional charges for that amount of water used. The city of Lodi seems to think that chlorination will fix this problem and needs to require their contractors to use devices when stealing water from fire hydrants, which some do without the city either knowing or sometimes rumored to look the other way to help out their same old magically low bidding "pet" contractors to protect themselves from a serious problem with the now faltering, once stellar, drinking water supply. So if the city of Lodi merely says it is just the water flow changing direction in certain places, so be it. A lot of that "plugging in the washing machine or sinks is from the disturbance of the underground infrastructure by these contractors, improper flushing, especially of the small lines from the tapping tees/saddles that are washing unflushed construction debris from the combination new/old piping from those tees/saddles to the residence. And why did the city of Lodi seemingly run Teichert off and give this phase to Knife River? Why would they change contractors mid stream and bring in the site work contractor from Reynolds Ranch, who themselves used free city of Lodi water on that project without the use of any meter/backflow prevention device, to do the plumbing work with a force of laborers? This just sounds like more good old boy gerrymandering by the Lodi public works director and staff and Lodi city council and management, seemingly at the Lodi ratepayers risk of second class drinking water?

     
  • Doug Mercer posted at 9:29 am on Wed, May 15, 2013.

    airwright Posts: 3

    No problems with calcium in the water at my house, its the fact that it smells and tastes like river water that bothers me.


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