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Lodi firefighter Kris Graves appears on Food Network show

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Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:00 am | Updated: 6:17 am, Thu Jun 16, 2011.

Lodi firefighter Kris Graves literally gave his blood, sweat and tears to fulfill a life-long dream: starring in a cooking show on the Food Network.

He shed blood after cutting his finger two hours before he was supposed to feed 100 people. He dripped with sweat while running through an unfamiliar grocery store grabbing supplies. And he teared up while talking about his mother, who died of cancer six years ago.

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Welcome to the discussion.

9 comments:

  • Ryan Jameson posted at 7:54 am on Sat, Jun 18, 2011.

    Ryan Jameson Posts: 195

    Doug, I would never have any need or desire to lug a hose around like the fire gods. So your scenario is void. So if I am understanding you correctly, you think that the ability to hold a high pressure 4" hose gives you the right to waste taxpayer money with grocery store trips?

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 7:39 am on Sat, Jun 18, 2011.

    Doug Chaney Posts: 1232

    Ryan, what a rebuttal. Getting laid? These firefighters also provide professional emergency services and are almost always first responders on any 911 emergency medical call. They provided those valuable services for me last November when I had a major heart attack, responding in just over a minute at my residence from the fire station near Elm to administer life saving techniques and oxygen until AMR arrived and transported me to the hospital. And, yes, they are my heroes, got a problem with that? My offer still stands to show you the receiving end of that fire hose. I'll bet those "hose jockeys" would turn out in hordes to save your life when that 4" fire hose starts beating you to death?

     
  • JoAnne Mounce posted at 11:08 pm on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    JoAnne Mounce Posts: 18

    You did a awesome job Kris! Congratulations on winning the battle. You and your brother Mike made Lodi proud.

     
  • Ryan Jameson posted at 9:53 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Ryan Jameson Posts: 195

    Doug I don't think I made a silly comment at all. I think it is utterly ridiculous how much we see fire engines parked in grocery store parking lots. How much fuel is being burned on these little excursions? That fuel is tax payer dollars! It does not take multiple trips to the store from a single firehouse in a single day. Trust me, on a daily basis I see the same shiny red fire truck and the same hose jockeys going to the same same store several times on the same day. They claim to be grocery shopping but I suspect that they are really trying to pick up girls. After all they are "heroes" and they have a really dangerous job the three times a year they actually fight a fire. Chicks just love that!!! Of course the cost of the hose jockeys getting laid is only tax payer money for all the fuel they consume. Let's face it Doug, there are dangerous factors to the hose jockeys chosen profession, but these guys have you suckered in to thinking they are constantly "in danger" and therefore you should fall on your knees and worship them as the "fire gods". Of course whenever a situation is too dangerous for the FD who do they always call to come protect them? The PD.

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 9:27 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Doug Chaney Posts: 1232

    oops!

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 9:27 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Doug Chaney Posts: 1232

    Ryan, maybe you can make such an absurd statement such as that when your house is burning down and it takes 10 minutes to get any response because of layoffs, cuts in communication, station closures and cutbacks. I'd just love to take you out with me or the FD and give you a 2 1/2, or worse yet, 4" fire hose connected to a hydrant and allow me to open that hydrant with anywhere from typically 60-120psi and watch as you tried to control that hose alone. It would have to be in a vacant field in order for that flying hose not to kill you or someone else or severely damage structures or anything else in its way. And if that fire hose happens to bee attached to a fire truck with pumper capabilities, the pressure can be boosted to over 200psi. I've conducted every test imaginablle concerning flow tests and undergound flushing of systems for foreign materials, dirty muddy water and debris for fire districts in the western US and that was always the most worrisome part of my job, especially fire pump room electric or diesel flow tests. It was my responsibility being foreman to devise a system to lash those fire hoses down to keep them from moving and then getting next to the dangerous nozzles long enough to insert a pitot tube into the stream to verify the psi with either one or more electric or diesel fire pumps running at maximum rpm's or the system control valve wide open, all the while getting soaking wet in the process. That's why I always made sure I had a good apprentice with me to be my pitot tube man. Flushing any underground installation requires the same process as full flow processes, except the fire hose has to have an open end to assure the FD a full flow with usually a 4" fire hose with an open end so the FD is able to see what washes from the entire underground fire protection system installation and if not secured properly can start whipping like a snake withas little as 40psi, damaging anything in its way, including a risk to human life or a debilitating lifetime injury. Most fire jurisdictions want anywhere from 1 to 5 minute full flows with the control valves wide open or the diesel or electric fire pumps running full bore. I bring this very important point up to illustrate the initial hazards of being a firefighter that most don't realize exist. How many would think that those tuna eating firefighters face that simple risk before getting down to the real nitty gritty? Today's firefighters are fortunate to have fire hose nozzles and apparatus that either reduce the pressure or use special water dispersing fire hose nozzles to allow one man to control a smaller, lower pressure fire hose. Or as with the ladder apparatus trucks, there are special attachments with directional nozzles that are securely held that only require the firefighter to simply point the water stream toward the desired area. Between firefighters and the fire sprinkler fitters tradesmen, both union and non-union, the people of the world are assured the best possible fire protection and firefighting techniques in the world to keep them as safe as possible with the only restriction being the area lawmakers and fire code laws and the extent to which they are enacted and enforced and the funding available to each particular area.

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 9:27 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Doug Chaney Posts: 1232

    Ryan, maybe you can make such an absurd statement such as that when your house is burning down and it takes 10 minutes to get any response because of layoffs, cuts in communication, station closures and cutbacks. I'd just love to take you out with me or the FD and give you a 2 1/2, or worse yet, 4" fire hose connected to a hydrant and allow me to open that hydrant with anywhere from typically 60-120psi and watch as you tried to control that hose alone. It would have to be in a vacant field in order for that flying hose not to kill you or someone else or severely damage structures or anything else in its way. And if that fire hose happens to bee attached to a fire truck with pumper capabilities, the pressure can be boosted to over 200psi. I've conducted every test imaginablle concerning flow tests and undergound flushing of systems for foreign materials, dirty muddy water and debris for fire districts in the western US and that was always the most worrisome part of my job, especially fire pump room electric or diesel flow tests. It was my responsibility being foreman to devise a system to lash those fire hoses down to keep them from moving and then getting next to the dangerous nozzles long enough to insert a pitot tube into the stream to verify the psi with either one or more electric or diesel fire pumps running at maximum rpm's or the system control valve wide open, all the while getting soaking wet in the process. That's why I always made sure I had a good apprentice with me to be my pitot tube man. Flushing any underground installation requires the same process as full flow processes, except the fire hose has to have an open end to assure the FD a full flow with usually a 4" fire hose with an open end so the FD is able to see what washes from the entire underground fire protection system installation and if not secured properly can start whipping like a snake withas little as 40psi, damaging anything in its way, including a risk to human life or a debilitating lifetime injury. Most fire jurisdictions want anywhere from 1 to 5 minute full flows with the control valves wide open or the diesel or electric fire pumps running full bore. I bring this very important point up to illustrate the initial hazards of being a firefighter that most don't realize exist. How many would think that those tuna eating firefighters face that simple risk before getting down to the real nitty gritty? Today's firefighters are fortunate to have fire hose nozzles and apparatus that either reduce the pressure or use special water dispersing fire hose nozzles to allow one man to control a smaller, lower pressure fire hose. Or as with the ladder apparatus trucks, there are special attachments with directional nozzles that are securely held that only require the firefighter to simply point the water stream toward the desired area. Between firefighters and the fire sprinkler fitters tradesmen, both union and non-union, the people of the world are assured the best possible fire protection and firefighting techniques in the world to keep them as safe as possible with the only restriction being the area lawmakers and fire code laws and the extent to which they are enacted and enforced and the funding available to each particular area. You're much more intelligent than that silly comment, Ryan, and I respect you for that. I seem to be guilty of doing that quite often myself. Have a nice day and hope I could teach you something new today, as you do the same for me.

     
  • Doug Chaney posted at 9:23 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Doug Chaney Posts: 1232

     
  • Ryan Jameson posted at 5:48 am on Thu, Jun 16, 2011.

    Ryan Jameson Posts: 195

    This guy probably went grocery shopping with his entire fire station crew in the shiny red fire engine! Cause you know it takes 5 hose jockeys to buy a can of tuna.

     
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