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California taxpayers soaked for out-of-state parolees

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Posted: Friday, September 18, 2009 10:00 pm

For the past six years, more out-of-state parolees have come to California than have left for other states.

Each one, who committed a crime elsewhere but is allowed to come to this state, must be supervised by parole agents paid for by California taxpayers.

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Welcome to the discussion.

7 comments:

  • posted at 2:15 pm on Mon, Sep 21, 2009.

    Posts:

    DeputyChief- I have limited knowledge of the process, but I was told that the big hold up in out of state transfers is in California, they refuse to use the computerized ICOTs database. Paperwork is prepared & mailed to the Sac Interstate office where it is submitted to the federal system, the whole process taking 90-180 days. Once it is entered electronically, as is done in 49 states (all but Cali) it is instantly accessible to the other state. If you have other information, I would be interested in learning more.

     
  • posted at 9:58 am on Mon, Sep 21, 2009.

    Posts:

    Pixiedust,Your comment, "Interstate Compact simply administers the law, they do not supervise offenders, nor do they make any decision regarding the transfer of offenders."They are extremely slow as the intermediary in between two supervising law enforcement agencies (Probation/Parole) to facilitate the out of state transfer process. The two agencies (who both have extremely high caseloads) should be able to communicate directly for transfer, eliminating the need for the interstate compact mediation or all of the Out of State Transfers should be denied. Interstate Compact is nothing more than a middle man requiring a lot of unneccessary paperwork. In my opinion the State will not lose anything by eliminating Interstate Compact, and they will have money.

     
  • posted at 2:32 am on Mon, Sep 21, 2009.

    Posts:

    DeputyChief- you state that Interstate Compact is "ineffectual and not worth the money" What in the world are you talking about? Interstate Compact simply administers the law, they do not supervise offenders, nor do they make any decision regarding the transfer of offenders.Giovanina states"..they become anonymous then they are able to commit more crimes". Are you aware that in order to transfer their supervision a parolee must have a support system, i.e. wife/mom&dad/ etc in the receiving state, a stable place to live and job prospects? Do you think the public is safer if you throw them out in the street homeless after they get out of prison? Some of you people need to come to grips with the fact that about 90% of people who go to prison are going to be released from prison. If there is a reasonable mechanism in place for getting offenders transferred to an environment where they have a support system in place they are less likely to reoffend. As a result, the public is safer and the costs to society in terms of welfare/medicaid costs are reduced.

     
  • posted at 4:26 pm on Sun, Sep 20, 2009.

    Posts:

    My experience with Interstate Compact is that they are ineffectual in preforming their duties and are NOT worth their cost.

     
  • posted at 9:28 am on Sat, Sep 19, 2009.

    Posts:

    The state is going to Hell in a hand basket, unfortunately I am to old to move, however if I could I would. Welders are needed everywhere.To let over 20,000 non-violent prisoners out early or otherwise means that they will most likely do what got them put into prison in the first place, since what ever that was, was easier than an honest days work, even if they could, who wants to hire an ex-con over a person that has never been in trouble with the law. Talk about a revolving door.

     
  • posted at 4:55 am on Sat, Sep 19, 2009.

    Posts:

    What it does do is allow criminals to move into areas that fon't know them or their case. They become almost anonymous then they are able to commit more crimes.Repeat offenders should not be let out. Maybe the death penalty should start including repeat offenders of crimes.

     
  • posted at 2:06 am on Sat, Sep 19, 2009.

    Posts:

    Transferring parole supervision either into or out of California is a lengthy difficult process. The parolee must have a spouse, or immediate family, in the receiving state who have lived there for more than 6 months and can prove they can support the parolee. The home and the family members are screened by the receiving state before the parolee's transfer is granted.Under the interstate compact each state can charge fees both for the application for transfer and for offender supervision. California has not opted to charge any fees. Supervision costs more in California because parole agents earn more than in any other state. Bottom line is, statistics are great, but what is the solution? Should California drop out of the interstate compact in order to save two million dollars? If it does, then what happens to parolees who try to transfer out of California and will, as a result, be homeless and unemployed if forced to remain in California?Ms. Bohm's idea of dismantling the interstate compact in order to save two million dollars is a bit like cutting off your nose to spite your face.

     
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