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Snapshot: News-Sentinel readers rate their vacations Retired Lodians get their hands on the Trans-Atlantic Pipeline

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Posted: Friday, March 29, 2013 7:11 am

Who went: Robert and Pauline Litfin.

Where you’re from: Lodi.

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NEW YORK (AP) — The Super Bowl ad games have so far delivered a nod to the Brady Bunch, voiceovers from Muhammad Ali and John F. Kennedy and Mindy Kaling trying to steal a kiss from fellow actor Matt Damon.

Skittles, a first-timer to the big game, got some extra publicity early on when Marshawn Lynch popped some of his favorite candies into his mouth on the sideline. The Mars candy then aired an ad depicting a town where people, dogs and babies have massively overdeveloped arms because differences are settled with arm wrestling.

Here's a look at the ads so far. Check back throughout the night for updates.

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WEIGHT WATCHERS CONFRONTS FOOD

The first Super Bowl ad by the struggling weight loss company featured tantalizing food ads and marketing, an apparent illustration of the constant temptations facing dieters.

The company says it wants to help people lose weight, but for some viewers, the ad may have just triggered cravings for junk food.

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MINDY ISN'T INVISIBLE

Nationwide's ad featured Mindy Kaling who thinks she's invisible because everyone treats her that way. But when she tries to kiss Matt Damon, she discovers that isn't the case.

In case it wasn't clear, the idea is that Nationwide doesn't treat its customers like they're invisible.

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COKE FIGHTS INTERNET TROLLS

Coke says it's standing for happiness in the face of Internet trolls.

The 60-second ad was a modern-day twist on Coke's long-running strategy of getting people to associate its soft drinks with happiness.

In addition to the "Make It Happy" TV ad, Coca-Cola has been releasing online clips featuring testimonials from those who say they've been the victims of online negativity, including football player Michael Sam.

Coca-Cola and other big brands have also been targets for online negativity; health advocates frequently criticize Coke for its marketing of sugary drinks.

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FIRST QUARTER, TWO HISTORIC VOICEOVERS

Toyota kicked off the ad games with a spot for featuring Paralympic medalist Amy Purdy snowboarding and dancing, set to a speech by Muhammad Ali that ends with: "I'll show you how great I am."

A little while later, Carnival cruises aired its first Super Bowl ad, which featured an audio clip of John F. Kennedy expressing his love of the sea.

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PUPPY LOVE ... AGAIN

Budweiser's "Lost Puppy" ad was a winner before it even aired during the Super Bowl. The ad, which shows a puppy running away to find his Clydesdale buddies, already had 18 million views on YouTube ahead of the game.

It's a tried-and-true formula. Last year, Budweiser broke records with its Super Bowl spot, "Puppy Love," which was a Top 10 branded content video and Top 10 video overall on YouTube. Some fun facts about this year's spot:

—Eight puppies are featured in the ad, all of which were just a few months old at the time of filming

—Seven Budweiser Clydesdales underwent training for three months to fine-tune their skills for the ad.

—The song in the spot, "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" is performed by Sleeping At Last.

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MARCIA, MARCIA, MARCIA!

Snickers scores some laughs early in the first quarter with an ad recreating a famous Brady Bunch scene.

Actor Danny Trejo plays an agitated Marcia Brady with a broken nose, continuing the Snickers advertising theme that people aren't themselves when they're hungry.

The kicker comes when the camera cuts to Steve Buscemi as he stands on the Brady's familiar staircase, reciting middle sister Jan's line of exasperation: "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!"

"This isn't about you Jan," says Florence Henderson, the actress who played Carole Brady. This prompts Buscemi to run away, exasperated, while shouting: "It never is!"

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TIME TRAVEL WITH BMW

Somehow, TV journalists Katie Couric and Bryant Gumbel seem to know what "twerk" means.

The former "Today" show hosts poked fun at themselves in an ad for BMW's new all-electric car. The ad features a clip from 1994 when Couric and Gumbel express puzzlement over the concept of the Internet and the "at" symbol in email addresses.

Fast-forward to present day, and they're expressing similar confusion about BMW's i3 car. Toward the end of the commercial, Gumbel asks Couric if she can twerk.

"Maybe," Couric says.

For those who aren't familiar with the term, Urban Dictionary defines it as "the rhythmic gyrating of the lower fleshy extremities in a lascivious manner with the intent to elicit sexual arousal."

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PRE-GAME SCORES

Two ads immediately preceding the game grabbed viewers' attention. Chevrolet's ad "Blackout" appeared to be a live game feed that turned into static and a blank screen. But Chevrolet used the trick to show that its Colorado truck has 4G LTE Wi Fi, so you could stream the game live in the truck.

Then an Esurance ad showed celebrity Lindsay Lohan trying to pick up a boy from school. When he protests that she's not his mother she says she's "sorta" his mom because they're the same age range and have seen a lot of miles.

"When it comes to the big things (like your mom or your car insurance) sorta just doesn't cut it," a voiceover states.

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NEWCOMERS ABOUND

There will be 15 newcomers to advertising's biggest stage on this year, including Loctite glue and website host Wix.com. That's the highest number of newbies since 2000.

Advertising experts say the interest from first-time advertisers is a sign companies are feeling good about the most recent economic recovery.

Still, Super Bowl ads are a big gamble for small companies. Some succeed in becoming a household name; Godaddy.com established itself with a racy Super Bowl spot 11 years ago. But others misfire; Groupon's first and only Super Bowl effort in 2011 aimed to be a tongue-in-cheek take on public service announcements, but was criticized for being insensitive

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MCDONALD'S WANTS LOVING

Taking a page from Coca-Cola, McDonald's recently launched an ad campaign seeking to tie its brand with the uplifting emotion of loving.

For its Super Bowl ad, the fast-food chain is featuring a promotion that lets randomly selected customers pay for their orders with small acts of love, like a high-five or a call to a relative. The promotion starts Monday and runs through Feb. 14

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Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi

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